Monday, March 21, 2011

Camerata



After many years of playing along on other people's projects, some good, some great and some ... , I have formed myself a very small unconducted string orchestra. Its essentially a string quartet with double bass. I have uncovered several very talented musicians looking for a playing opportunity and we had our first rehearsal last week. We are enjoying the intimate ensemble, but may expand if required. We fancy ourselves as a camerata, and hope to invite soloists to join us to play. If you fancy yourself as a soloist, and have something that you would love to perform and would like an opportunity to perform, give me a call.

I finally understand my father's love of print music. The arrival of the above repertoire last week was very exciting. I find myself continuing to search for interesting musical possibilities.





Viola in progress: My tone wood supplier in Germany spent a couple of weeks searching through his racks for this highly figured one piece maple viola wood. Based on the Andrea Gaurneri Conte Vitale 1676, it is a larger model at 16 1/4 inches with broad centre bout which should result in power and projection, at a yet manageable size.



Bass bow baguettes: BAM!

Much anticipated, long awaited, procured via a process involving nothing less than bureaucratic insanity. Number 1 Bass bow is long overdue but now underway, for my long-suffering maestro. It won't be long now Michael, I promise.

Sunday, March 06, 2011

Cello Bow No. 1


It's all go here in the small workshop. Two violins, a satisfyingly large model viola and a cello are all underway, not to mention the bow commissions impatiently waiting in the wings.

The bass bow wood (sticks of Brazilian pernambuco) finally arrived from the USA. It was received with much excitement. After languishing at CITES for a few weeks, the supplier was told that as it was such a small amount it didn't require certification and was sent forthwith and after months of waiting, arrived in a few days.

Due to the rarity of pernambuco and the difficulty in obtaining it, I have started a little experimentation. The first experimental bow made from Tasmanian Dogwood a has been tested and has come up - not quite right. The wood isn't sufficiently dense, its too light and is refusing to be bent into the correct cambre. It works but unfortunately is not an adequate replacement.

I have another half a dozen Tasmanian species to try, but I am not sure when I will have the time to continue the experimentation.

I will keep you posted.